TV is the Thing This Year… Handle With Care

Let’s start this post with a soundtrack…

So, what does this song have to do with bikes?

What does this look like to you?

Apparently Tee Vee is STILL the thing here in the USA.

I learned from Bicycling Magazine (which basically lifted a CNN report) that Dutch bicycle manufacturer Vanmoof figured out how to solve a problem with damages in shipping.

More than 25 percent of its bikes were damaged in delivery. The problem was especially bad when shipping to the U.S.

The solution? Reconsider the packaging. “We asked ourselves, what do Americans really love? What would prompt couriers to be delicate with a parcel?” VanMoof co-founder Taco Carlier told CNN. Damages dropped by 80 percent since then, according to the company.
Inside this box…

Is actually this bike:

Nicely done VanMoof!

 

Focus on Driving

This morning on my ride to work I noticed a smashed up car pushed off the road along Alki Avenue.

Someone had to be driving pretty fast to push a car off the road (or be pushed).

As my Nordic-American people say, it could have been worse.  In fact, here’s a sign to show how it could have been worse, probably caused in the same crash:

Meanwhile, rather than focusing on the carnage caused by inattentive and/or angry motor vehicle drivers, some people seem more concerned about this “obnoxious” “visual pollution.”

I think we should focus on driving, whether we are the drivers or we are just affected by them.  Cars kill. Tipped over bikes… not so much.

For instance, not much further along my commute, I came upon this car, rapidly backing down the bike path.

Let’s keep our eyes on the ball… or our eyes on the cars.

Eye in the Sky

Washington Bike Law is helping a new company called Placemeter get accurate traffic counts that can not only specify bikes, people, cars, buses, but track their speeds and directions as well.  It can even count crashes and close-calls.

photo info

Today’s new technology post has a soundtrack… from 1982 (it sounds better than I remember and seems to be on-point here):

How is Washington Bike Law helping?  It’s not by coding I assure you!  Our office is merely a test location for one of the Placementer sensors… we’ve been monitoring the intersection of Second and Cherry for a few months now, including traffic on the Second Avenue Bike Lane.

data

This new technology is starting to get press.  Fortune magazine and Fast Company just did stories on it and… 15 Minutes of Fame… our view over Second and Cherry is in both articles.

2nd and cherry

What about privacy?  Is the “eye in the sky” “The Man“?  Not really.  According to the Fast Company article, Placemeter “won’t use facial recognition to pinpoint individuals, nor will any people watch the video feeds. It is purposefully staying away from any security-related applications or customers … and couldn’t, say, help with a police search even if it wanted to.”

Who cares then?  We do.  Bike people.  Fast Company quotes Placemeter’s CEO Alex Winters as saying that bike activists interested in making the case for bike lanes could find it useful. “Typically, that kind of data has been out of reach for most community groups”.

Now how might more data be helpful in Seattle, land of process and little action?  Consider this recent PI headline:

Superyacht marina ownerclaims Seattle cycle track may threaten environment

The Yachties assert that the Westlake Cycletrack “will create unsafe conflicts between pedestrians, cyclists and commercial business traffic.”

Having easy access to accurate data might help.  We don’t want more endless litigation like with the “Missing Link” stopping transportation improvements.

Perhaps it’s naive to think that facts could help resolve conflicts, but I am hopeful.  And, hey, right now “I am the eye in the sky…”

The Sound of Freedom… on a Bike

In honor of MLK Day I planned to post this video illustrating what I think might be called “The Sound of Freedom”:

Some people in Washington think that this is the Sound of Freedom:

The purpose of this post is not to debate military issues.  Instead, as a different King once asked us, “can we all get along?”

The answer is yes… through BIKE-partisanship.  Dr. Martin Luther King was a great leader for civil rights… and he rode a bike:

MLK on a bike

Yesterday, as the Seattle Seahawks qualified for the Superbowl, what did Michael Bennett, Jr. do?

He rode a bike.  Riding a bike is a great way to celebrate.  Riding a bike makes the sound of freedom.  Riding a bike makes you King.  And we need more Kings!

Bikes, Skateboards and Ramps… Oh My!

Recently, I noticed a cement ramp added overnight to a bridge support column for the West Seattle Bridge along the bicycle and pedestrian path.  I suspected that it might be a gorilla skate ramp and, when another skate park item was cemented into the path a week or two later, I was sure of it.

The ramp is on the top of this photo, it’s a bit hard to see, but that’s my concern… someone may hit the side of it and crash.

skate add

This expanding skate park is in the middle of a bike path intersection with limited visibility and bicyclists coming downhill from the right with a fair bit of speed.

I’m concerned that bicyclists and skaters could collide here.

skate bad

Now why would skaters do this?  Aren’t there safer places to skate… like this waterfront space (complete with anti-skating bars and NO SKATEBOARDING signs):

skate why

I suppose I’m willing to cut the skateboarders some slack, but I hope no one gets hurt.

I’ve also noticed some other new ramps in Pioneer Square  that I whole-heartily endorse

good ramp

Seattle is so inconsistent with its curb cuts for wheelchairs and bicyclists.  Some intersections have them, some do not.  In Pioneer Square there are some very high curbs with no cuts.  At this intersection, the new ramps serve multiple purposes.  They help people on wheels cross the street and the slow traffic on the street making it a safer area for all users.  Well done SDOT!